What’s Going On At Fort Campbell, Kentucky?

Campbell

The state of Kentucky has, at times, been considered a rather odd place. Tracing the state’s northern border, one can follow the Ohio River all the way down to its tributaries that empty into the southwest end, forming a cluster of counties that are riddled with odd stories of weird creatures, mysterious flying objects, and an entire host of other strange mysteries. It is indeed very odd that little rural areas the likes of Kelly and Hopkinsville, over in Christian County on Kentucky’ southern border, have had such strange myths associated with them; ever since the mid 1950s, when literal reports of “goblins” began to stem from one branch of the Sutton family over near Hopkinsville, the place has been host to periodic reports of the weird and unsavory variety (and speaking of things weird and unsavory, if you’re a fan of late-night radio that gives you the creeps, check out the latest Gralien Podcast).

Despite the urban legends that have become appended to such rural parts of the Ohio River Basin, there is something of a modern mythos surrounding the region as well, drawing from reports of odd aerial happenings down along the Kentucky/Tennessee border. In fact, if one drives just ten miles south of Hopkinsville’s city limits, they will soon approach the home of the American 101st Airborne Division, along with the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, located at an Army installation known as Fort Campbell.

Much like other clandestine locales across the United States (Area 51, the highly-secretive base near Groom Lake, Nevada, comes to mind), many have asserted over the years that there are numerous oddities associated with Fort Campbell, ranging from strange synchronistic parallels to famous rock bands and iconic artists, to the appearances of UFOs and covert “black helicopters” associated with popular conspiracy theories. But what might draw one into taking an interest in such a location? For me, it all started falling together, and innocently enough, following an odd email that appeared in my inbox, which referred to the place as “The Area 51 of Appalachia.”

Fort Campbell:

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Comments

What’s Going On At Fort Campbell, Kentucky? — 25 Comments

  1. Your writing smacks heavily of that of a junior in a high school creative writing class. By the time I got to that which you are actually covering in the story….I had lost interest.
    Thank you so much.

  2. I am a 75 yr. old long retired professional commercial pilot w/ over 14K hrs. and have seen many ‘illusions’. But none of these were. I have seen 4 UFOs in my life-time: 3 in day-time, one while airborne w/an aeronautical engineer aboard (he was shocked!), and one at night.
    The first one, in 1967, did un-believable maneuvers (and I heard it) – in sight for about 5 min. None of the 4 looked alike. They were as visible and discernable as a Boeing 747 or any other aircraft.
    “For those who believe, no proof is necessary – for those who don’t,
    none will suffice.”

  3. Hey Lon, thanks for the updated link; I had linked to your forum initially where that MUFON report had been included, but for some reason when clicking it, the page came up saying the site had been blocked (which is funny, because I had been able to look at it while editing the article). I’ve added the update you posted to the original link in the new article as well… good work!

  4. Hi Micah. And kudos to the retired pilot Von Ives. Takes guts to go against the paradigm and state what is true. I liked the story. Some people I guess however do not understand the need for a lead up. There is a reason for that. It is so that you can take the reader to point of understanding. Instant gratification is not all that it is cracked up to be. Good Story Micah I enjoyed it. Now if we could only get to the whole truth I think it would outdo anything that the science fiction writers could ever conceive of. Simply because truth really is stranger than fiction.

  5. Some years ago when I lived in Iowa I saw a small black UFO that was hovering above the house I lived in. I tried to figure out what it was. It didn’t look like anything I’ve ever seen before. I heard no sound coming from it. I stood out on the porch in the day time and watched it for a long time. Finally, it started moving very slowly away from the house into the distance over the neighborhood. Then it looked like it flew straight up slowly and disappeared into the clouds. It didn’t look like a balloon or a garbage bag or an airplane or a helicopter or a bird or anything in this world. I’ve looked up to the skies many times in my life. I’m still looking up in the sky during the day, and at night. I believe that what people think are aliens are actually evil spirits who deceive people into thinking they are good. I know everyone believes differently. I believe there is a spiritual war going on between God and His angels, and evil spirits or fallen angels. Some people trust in aliens or fallen angels, evil spirits. I put my trust and faith in God, and Jesus Christ.

  6. Sorry but the Laurel Canyon – Fort Campbell conspiracy stuff (I clicked on the link) is just flippin’ whack. This dude probably checks under his bed before going to sleep at night. Another hapless victim of America’s conspiracy pandemic.

    • I agree PurrlGurrl that the Laurel Canyon tie-in with all the rock musicians is a little tenuous… ha ha. But it is pretty neat that Jimi Hendrix (one of my personal favorite guitarists ever) had been stationed there at the base for a brief period… that’s primarily the only reason that link was included. But yes, to suppose that a conspiracy existed to literally control those musician’s careers seems a bit odd, eh?

  7. I am from Hopkinsville, home of Edgar Casey. I know something is going on there. Just as I have paranorma phenomenom going on with my life. Since I learned to remember

  8. Hi Micah! I love your articles, especially those in Intrepid Mag! Any how, I just had a police officer, here in Colorado, send me photos of what looks like a blank black space shining down 15-20 lights to the ground. (Reminicent of the Battle of LA pic, but the lights are verticle from the craft). He watched it for several minutes, took a few cell phone photos and called his fellow officers outside of precinct to see it to. He called channel 9 news and DIA air traffic control to see if they knew what the lights were. Channel 9 had nothing. DIA said they had nothing on radar or reports, however they could see the lights from the tower. When the lights moved away, they watched through binoculars and saw what they describe as black hawk helicopters escorting the UFO. Makes me wonder if it was the Night Stalkers.

  9. I lived and worked as a civilian employee at Fort Campbell in the 70′s. My boss was a retired colonel, over reallocation and renovation of barracks and other buildings as the 101st was returning from Viet Nam. He gave me a key one day and directions, said I might be interested in what was behind the door. So I drove back in the boondocks of the post, but not too far, and found the big metal door as he had described. It wasn’t to a building, but a mound with a concrete front. I opened it, and there underground was a huge hospital and living facility. I didn’t go very far back into it, and the lighting was dim, but it was unbelievable. When I got back to the office, my boss told me that the bunker was a little-known asset and would be needed again, as it had been during WWII. No one was working in it when I saw it, but it was fully functional. I asked my husband, who was stationed there at the time, if he had heard about it, and he had not. My boss said that a lot of things went on at Fort Campbell that most people never could imagine.

    I’m from what they call Appalachia, pronounced apple atcha, and have been here all my life. This whole stretch of Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee is full of old stories of strange happenings. I’ve seen a few personally, and I wouldn’t doubt anything. My little corner of southwest Virginia, where the three states come together, has an energy all its own. Anything can happen.

  10. I sure would like to talk with you. I live on the Lake just a few miles from here. You would not believe what Ive seen in the sky and water!

  11. Somebody’s a moron… Fort Campbell and western Kentucky have about as much to do with Appalachia as Lincoln, Nebraska has to do with the Rocky Mountains. Check your geography before speaking out.

  12. My daughter was stationed at Fort Campbell and I saw several black helicopters at the base many ,many times. As for the rest, any thing is possible.

  13. I served in the Army and was stationed at Fort Campbell in 1968. There is a naval base inside Fort Campbell. It has three or four rows of barbed wire fences with patrols/dogs both inside and out. It appears to be all underground as far as I could see at the time. Special caravans with tarp covered flatbeds came and went from the facility. I was on manuvers at the time and was able to watch this activity.

  14. You do realize that from 1947-late 60s that Fort Campbell was the storage facility for the majority of the US nuclear arsenal, do you not? It was run by the US Airforce for a few years but then the US Navy took it over. It is now declassified. If you want to know all about it, search for “Clarksville Base”. I grew up in Hopkinsville. We were on the base a lot. We referred to it as “the Bird cage” and were terrified to drive by it. If you had a flat, you were required to keep driving on the flat until you were out of sight of it. If you stopped to change it you were subject to be shot. We had no idea what they did there. Its all declassified now. It was possibly one of the top five nuclear targets on the Soviet targeting lists.

    Yep, search for Clarksville base and you will find your reason that UFOs might be interested in the Fort Campbell area. You can actually tour the base nowadays.

    Clarksville Base had so much nuclear weaponry it would make Rensham Forrest look like an old phone booth in the desert.

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